News & Updates

Board Member Ruth Van Stee Presents at May 12 Torch Club

Ruth Van Stee to speak at Torch Club on May 12.

For the May 12 Torch Club meeting, Ruth Van Stee, secretary of the GGRWHC board, will present her inspiring and fun talk on A Suffragist Spring:  Taking Over the Grand Rapids Press in 1914. When setting goals for 1914, the National Equal Suffrage Association called for rallies, participation in parades, and the take over of local newspapers for a day across the country to argue for the cause. The Grand Rapids Equal Suffrage Association met that challenge by editing and producing the May 2, 1914, edition. Ruth will talk about that edition, the local women involved, and the role this local event played in the national suffrage movement.

  

Take the MLive Poll and Share Your Thoughts on Honoring Kendrick and Eldering

Carolyn Shapiro-Shapin

At our recent annual celebration of Women's History Month, the program's topic was taken right out of MLive The Grand Rapids Press and other community and national news:  The startling outbreaks of deadly childhood diseases that have been preventable for decades through vaccinations. One of these deadly diseases was and is whooping cough or pertussis. In the 1930s, one of the first and best vaccinations was developed by two Grand Rapids researchers--Pearl Kendrick and Grace Eldering. With support from the community and dedicated laboratory help from chemist, Loney Clinton Gordon, they later refined their vaccine and shared it with the world. Now it seems only 75 years later, we have forgotten their remarkable discovery and why it was so important to not only our community, but also the nation and the world. At the time almost 6,000 American children a year were dying from whooping cough.

The Greater Grand Rapids Women’s History Council was delighted to have GVSU historian Carolyn Shapiro-Shapin, Editor of Mlive/The Grand Rapids Press Julie Hoogland, and Medical Reporter Sue Thoms join us to talk about Kendrick and Eldering and their life-saving work.

Which Historical Woman Should Replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 Bill? Time to VOTE Again!

Suffragists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton failed to make the second-round cut.

If you voted in the first round, you probably already know the results. If you didn't vote in that round, then your vote in the second round is even more important. To find out who came out on top and who has gone on to the final round, go to the "Women On 20s" web site. There you will find a special video that literally paints the pictures of the final four candidates.

Watch: Meet the Finalists

During the 5-week first-round voting, over 256,000 voters weighed in from all over the country. That's more than twice as many as needed to petition the White House.
The second round of voting is just as easy as the first. Pick you favorite candidate from the final four and cast your vote!

Cast: Your Final Ballot

When you're done or if you've already voted for a finalist, please spread the word through email, Facebook, Twitter, or some other social media! Let's make this historic change happen!